China being hacked, green energy?, and more: THE WEEKLY RECAP (2022#27)

Hardly finding some time to read these days, and almost even harder to write a post… I am in need of holidays. Let’s start:


The biggest hack ever?

The numbers here are astonishing. Almost one thousand million people’s data being hacked is no joke, and to make things worse, it seems that it was not stored in a secure location at all.

Nearly one billion people in China had their personal data leaked, and it’s been online for more than a year, on CNN

https://twitter.com/_KarenHao/status/1543949945614393344


Green energy?

This week we saw how the European Union declared gas and nuclear green energies. Yes, you read it correctly. Even though the declaration seems like a way to reduce the energy crisis caused by the Russian invasion of Ukraine, the mental acrobatics behind this move are no joke. It seems to me that, whenever we need to chose to fight between two crisis, we always delay the climate one. Let’s see how that turns out.

European Parliament says natural gas projects can be considered ‘green’ for investments, on CNN
Europe must not backslide on climate action despite war in Ukraine, on Nature
To end coal, adapt to regional realities, on Nature

Scrap that

Cool story of how many research groups are using scrapping techniques to obtain their datasets. I found it interesting because the first approach I had to web scrapping was to see examples on gathering personal data (names, addresses, etc.) in big quantities to do dubious stuff (selling to companies for doing targeted advertising, etc.). As of today, the thing is that many countries have very different stances on web scrapping, some of them do not really care, but in other places it is not even clear if it is a legal thing to do.

Need web data? Here’s how to harvest them, on Nature

Nature’s images of the month

Hugging bees, crabs and sponges being good friends to each other, and blood vessels in the brain are just some of the cool pictures of the month in Nature.

Space tarantula and sponge-wearing crab: June’s best science images, on Nature

And that’s it for the week. Stay safe!

Featured image: Karine Aigner, 2022 BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition

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